Search
  • Connie Chan

Get Out the Vote in November

Voter fatigue is real – San Francisco has held four elections this year. But our vote is our voice, and this November’s election is an important one.


Not only will we be voting on several state measures, including codifying abortion access, San Francisco voters will also have a say in several local measures and will choose candidates for elected office impacting all levels of our government. The election results from this November may very well fundamentally change the direction of San Francisco’s future in the next decade.


There's a lot on the ballot this year, so I wanted to share with you my personal endorsements for the November 2022 election. I believe these candidates and measures will help make City Hall be more accountable and transparent to working people, and make San Francisco more affordable and efficient.

I know many of us are overwhelmed by the pandemic, turned off by toxic political fights and by the lack of intellectually honest policy debates or smart policy solutions. Perhaps this is why voter turnout has been devastatingly low this year overall. But high voter participation is key to democracy, from federal elections all the way down to local office. Unfortunately, oftentimes many eligible voters sit out elections because they are either turned off by toxic political campaigns or they feel that their vote doesn’t matter.


That’s why this November, it is not good enough for us to just vote, we must also get others to vote. We must stand up, fight back with our civic engagement, turn out voters, and of course, vote ourselves. Vote like our democracy depends on it, because it does. We must stop the right wing power grab and make sure our working families, renters, immigrants and future generations can stay and thrive in our sanctuary city.


In solidarity,




Connie

Recent Posts

See All

Becoming homeless could happen to many of us – 59% of Americans are just one paycheck away from becoming homeless. California’s divestment from mental health treatment in the 1980’s, federal divestmen